thissideofthetruth

NOT THE OTHER

Tag: horror

The Meeting

The Meeting

Advertisements

The Man From The Sea

The Man From The Sea

The Texas Lot

Texas Lot

Book Monsters

book monsters

Street Of Crocs

Street of Crocodiles

Happy Happy

Happy Happy America

Where Is Everybody

The first episode of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone, broadcast on Friday October 2, 1959.

A man finds himself alone walking towards a diner. Inside he finds a jukebox playing loudly, and coffee hot on the stove, but no one else. He inquires for some breakfast, but no chef or waitress is to be found. He is dressed in an Air Force flight suit, but he does not remember who he is or how he got there.

The Tank

Altered States

Demon

Demon

Seconds

Seconds

The Wondrous

Danny van Ryswyk - The Wondrous

The Hound of the Baskervilles

Hound Of The Baskervilles

JarHead

head in a bell jar

The Abominable Snowman

 

the abominable snowman

The Twilight Zone

Night of the Meek

The Twilight Zone is an American television anthology series created by Rod Serling. Each episode (156 in the original series) is a mixture of self-contained drama, psychological thriller, fantasy, science fiction, suspense, or horror, often concluding with a macabre or unexpected twist. A popular and critical success, it introduced many Americans to serious science fiction and abstract ideas through television and also through a wide variety of Twilight Zone literature.

The program followed in the tradition of earlier shows like Tales of Tomorrow (1951–1953)—which also dramatized the short story “What You Need”—and Science Fiction Theatre (1955–1957), as well as radio programs such as The Weird Circle, X Minus One, and the radio work of Serling’s hero, dramatist Norman Corwin.

The success of the series led to a feature film, a radio series, a comic book, a magazine, and various other spin-offs that spanned five decades, including two “revival” television series. The first ran on CBS and in syndication in the 1980s, the second ran on UPN from 2002 to 2003.

An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

As a boy, Rod Serling was a fan of pulp fiction stories. As an adult, he sought topics with themes such as racism, government, war, society and human nature in general. Serling decided to combine these two interests as a way to broach these subjects on television at a time when such issues were not commonly addressed.

Throughout the 1950s, Serling established himself as one of the more popular names in television. He was as famous for writing televised drama as he was for criticizing the medium’s limitations. His most vocal complaints concerned censorship, which was frequently practiced by sponsors and networks. “I was not permitted to have my senators discuss any current or pressing problem,” he said of his 1957 production The Arena, intended to be an involving look into contemporary politics. “To talk of tariff was to align oneself with the Republicans; to talk of labor was to suggest control by the Democrats. To say a single thing germane to the current political scene was absolutely prohibited.”

Poster

Cube

Cube Poster

Cube is a 1997 Canadian science fiction psychological horror film, directed by Vincenzo Natali. The film was a successful product of the Canadian Film Centre’s First Feature Project.

The movie received a cult status for its surreal, Kafkaesque settings; it is set in identical cube-like rooms (hence the name) with each room being a different color (white, blue, green, amber and red), and no background story is revealed for the characters or the reason they were left in the Cube. The film also doesn’t demonstrate any clear plot regarding the Cube’s background, creation, purpose and its location. The timeframe of the story is also left unknown.

Cube

J&H

The Shining Film Trailer 1980

The Blob

Jacobs Ladder

 

Opera – famous peephole scene

The Wicker Man 1973

Image

Peeping Tom Poster

Peeping Tom Poster

the master

Image

Harry Clark. 1919. Illustration for 'Tales of Mystery and Imagination' by Edgar Allen Poe.

Harry Clark. 1919. Illustration for 'Tales of Mystery and Imagination' by Edgar Allen Poe.

Hitchcocks, 'The Birds'.

Hitchcocks, 'The Birds'.