thissideofthetruth

NOT THE OTHER

Month: April, 2013

Underwater Bubbles

UNDERWATER BUBBLES

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Water Elf

Water Elf

bubbles

Underwater Nude

Dance on the table

Champagne

Naughty Kate

Naughty Kate

Kurious Kate

Sly Kate

Dressed to Kill

Dressed2kill by Joerg Warda

More Than Honey

More Than Honey

Honey Comb

Honey Comb

Honey Bear Book

Honey Bear

Honey Bear

Chris Buzelli

Cubs

Cubs

Shanghai CatBert

CatBert

 

Cats Lots of ’em

Jose Segrellis

Book Monsters

book monsters

THE BELL JAR

Sylvia Reading

The Bell Jar is American writer and poet Sylvia Plath’s only novel, which was originally published under the pseudonym “Victoria Lucas” in 1963. The novel is semi-autobiographical with the names of places and people changed. The book is often regarded as a roman à clef, with the protagonist’s descent into mental illness paralleling Plath’s own experiences with what may have been clinical depression. Plath committed suicide a month after its first UK publication. The novel was published under Plath’s name for the first time in 1967 and was not published in the United States until 1971, pursuant to the wishes of Plath’s mother and her husband Ted Hughes.

Victoria,

The Bell Jar addresses the question of socially acceptable identity. It examines Esther Greenwood, a young woman from the suburbs of Boston’s, “quest to forge her own identity, to be herself rather than what others expect her to be”. Esther is expected to become a housewife, and a self-sufficient woman, without the options to achieve independence. Esther feels she is a prisoner to domestic duties and she fears the loss of her inner self. The Bell Jar sets out to highlight the problems with oppressive patriarchal society in mid-20th Century America. The men in Esther’s life are all oppressive, whether it is in a physical manner or an emotional one.

SP

trapped in the bell jar

The Bell Jar

The Yellow Wallpaper in shreds

Julia Callon

The Yellow Wallpaper

The Yellow Wallpaper

City Of Shadows

Alexey Titarenko

Atta Kim

In Buddhism, all objects, or in other words, color and matter are another word for space and space is another word for color. All objects can become one according to the concept of “all matter is emptiness” and the process of breaking down is called “emptiness is form.” In particular, Hua-yen Buddhism’s teachings of “one is all, all is one” is a physical analysis of how points build to space and space breaks down to a point. Buddhism’s “all matter is emptiness” does not mean a lack. I will use my work as an example.

New York

New York (2008) Indala Series  A photographic portrait of New York using 10,000 images.

My ON-AIR Project’s Indala Series (Indala is another word for Indra’s net, which refers to the concept of the interconnectedness of all things in the universe. New York, Washington, Moscow, Tokyo, Paris, London, Venice, Berlin, Athens, Seoul, Delhi, and others, comprise the 14 cities that are a part of this project). For the project, I took 10,000 photographs of New York and superimposed them to create one final picture.

The completed picture appears to be nothing but a blurry, gray image, but there are physically 10,000 photographs within it. Those 10,000 photographs of New York streets, buildings, people, and events were vividly captured over the course of several years, lovingly, with proper photographic technique. I’m not Buddhist and I didn’t do this project with the intention of explaining the concept of “all is emptiness,” but this is similar to that concept of emptiness. If one penetrates into the gray image (as in Heidegger’s concept of entwurf, or the mental process of absorption in something), one is able to meet again the countless events and identities melted into the 10,000 cuts. This process of disassembly is “emptiness is everything.” If one physically dismantles an analog picture, one is left with the particles that make up analog film; in a digital process, only the pixels are left. In the final gray image of the Indala project, those 10,000 photographs have become one and each has lost its function but their identity is not gone. Just like how my DNA contains all of humanity’s genes, identity does not disappear. This is similar to how the point’s identity is inherent in space. Ironically though, the final gray picture of one city composed of 10,000 different superimposed photographs is digitized and has no mass or volume; it only has form when it comes out.

Atta Kim

Budda

Budda Kamakura

Brazil

Brazil

Street Of Crocs

Street of Crocodiles

Ah Pook The Destroyer

Impact

Impact

Casualities Of War

wearedorothy

Vogue War Fashion Spread

Fashion Wars

Happy Happy

Happy Happy America

Tibbits Glory

Tibbits Glory

America. A Nuclear Device.

America. A Nuclear Device

Foolish War Mongers One And All

Back the Attack

The Great Saddness

War is an organized and often prolonged conflict that is carried out by states and/or non-state actors. It is characterised by extreme violence, social disruption, human suffering, and economic destruction. War should be understood as an actual, intentional and widespread armed conflict between political communities, and therefore is defined as a form of political violence or intervention. The set of techniques used by a group to carry out war is known as warfare. An absence of war is usually called peace.

Double Caring

O Lord our Father, our young patriots, idols of our hearts, go forth to battle — be Thou near them! With them — in spirit — we also go forth from the sweet peace of our beloved firesides to smite the foe. O Lord our God, help us to tear their soldiers to bloody shreds with our shells; help us to cover their smiling fields with the pale forms of their patriot dead; help us to drown the thunder of the guns with the shrieks of their wounded, writhing in pain;

Executions and USA disgrace.

American Bommbing Raid

help us to lay waste their humble homes with a hurricane of fire; help us to wring the hearts of their unoffending widows with unavailing grief; help us to turn them out roofless with little children to wander unfriended the wastes of their desolated land in rags and hunger and thirst, sports of the sun flames of summer and the icy winds of winter, broken in spirit, worn with travail, imploring Thee for the refuge of the grave and denied it —

Germans @ War

Vietnam

for our sakes who adore Thee, Lord, blast their hopes, blight their lives, protract their bitter pilgrimage, make heavy their steps, water their way with their tears, stain the white snow with the blood of their wounded feet!”    Mark Twain

Shelling From Afar

Gas Masks

“If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood/Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,/Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud/Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,/My friend, you would not tell with such high zest/To children ardent for some desperate glory,/The old Lie; Dulce et Decorum est/Pro patria mori.”   Wilfred Owen

'waiting for the war' by siwymortis

Girl with automatic assault weapon

girl with weapon

Frank with a Sniper Rifle

Frank with Sniper rifle

David Tennant aka DT. Me in Halifax Canada.

DT

Mr. Thompson

Mr. Thompson

Thompson Submachine Gun

Thompson Submachine Gun

Bonnie and Clyde

Bonnie & Clyde

Born Again Couple

Born Again Couple

Natural Born Killers

Cafe Couple

Cafe Couple

HomeSteaders

Jack Whinery and his wife Edith was taken by Russell Lee in Pie Town, NM, in Sept 1940.

Rattlebag Medicine 2

David Tennant in The Badlands

Take a Road Trip

Road Trip

Subtract

Subtract

Flying Bike

flying bike

Vintage Harley Girl

Vintage Harley Girl

Brothers Marlon & Lee

Marlon & Lee

Bill Ray and the Hells Angels of San Berdoo 1965

biker

“This was a new breed of rebel,” Bill Ray told LIFE.com, recalling his time with the Angels. “They didn’t have jobs, of course. They absolutely despised everything that most Americans value and strive for — stability, security. They rode their bikes, hung out in bars for days at a time, fought with anyone who messed with them. They were self-contained, with their own set of rules, their own code of behavior. It was extraordinary to be around.”

On the road

Ray spent some of the time with the Angels on a ride from San Bernardino (about 40 miles east of Los Angeles) to Bakersfield, California, for a major motorcycle rally. The Berdoo-Bakersfield run is a trip of only about 130 miles — but in 1965, it would offer enough moments (both placid and violent) for Ray to paint a rare, revelatory portrait of the world’s most legendary motorcycle club in its early days. The way in which the story came about, meanwhile, was as dramatic and unexpected as Bill Ray’s pictures.

talk to the hand

“It was exhilarating being around them, there’s no question about it,” Ray says. “You just never knew what they were going to do. You’re always kind of on edge, because — think about it! — these people have a lot of time to waste. They don’t punch a clock, so they fill the time drinking beer, smoking pot, screwing around. There was always a sense that anything could happen at any minute. Things could go from light-hearted to tense, and from tense to very scary, pretty goddamn quick.”

Biker Chicks

Ray and Joe Bride spent more than a month with the Angels in the spring of ’65, “mostly on weekends,” Ray remembers, “but the Bakersfield run was around the clock, three days and nights.” In Bakersfield,” remembers Ray, “I slept on the floor of the Blackboard Cafe — the bar that the Angels basically lived in while they were there.”

Brothers in Arms

“There’s a romance to the idea of the biker on the open road,” Ray says. “It’s similar to the romance that people attach to cowboys and the West — which, of course, is totally out of proportion to the reality of riding fences and punching cows. But no doubt, there’s something impressive about these Harley-Davidsons and bikers heading down the highway. You see the myth played out in movies, like Easy Rider, which came out a few years after I photographed the Angels. You know, the trail never ends for the cowboy, and the open road never ends for the Angels. They just ride. Where they’re going hardly matters. It’s not an easy life, but it’s what they choose. It’s theirs. And everyone else can get out of the way or go to hell.”

Up Yours Biker Chick

The Chosen Few

The Chosen Few 1959

Thankfull

Thankfull

Milk “Grow”

Coded

barcode head

Social Engineering – “Life in Plastic is Fantasic”

Barbies Night Out

Advertising directed toward children has been a concern for marketers, researchers and policy-makers for decades. The attention and concern is not without justification. Children see a great deal of advertising. Moore and Lutz (2000) reported that children in the age range of six to fourteen see an estimated 20,000 advertisements each year.

Like

Advertising practitioners recognize this and are more than willing to target children.

Essex Girl

Advertisements are known to have an impact on children, both consumption-related and unrelated to the product advertised. Increasing attention has been focused on the impact of advertising on children which is not directly related to the product. Advertisements have been linked to children’s self image, self concept, motivation and performance.

Advertising

Of increasing concern is the impact of role models in advertising on children.

Barbie Eyes

Dakota Rose Portrait

Dakota Rose by pechucky

Koto Warrior Fantasy

koto

SF Girl Warrior

Sci Fi Girl

PVC Figure

Shunya Yamashita PVC figure

Kotobukiya

Kotobukiya

Fallen Angel

Fallen Angel

Pearl Necklace

Pearls

Princess of the Sea

erin mulvehill

LO 2012, Swimmer.

The Swimmer

Book Jacket

The Swimmer” a short story by American author John Cheever, was originally published in The New Yorker on July 18, 1964, and then in the 1964 short story collection, The Brigadier and the Golf Widow. Originally conceived as a novel and pared down from over 150 pages of notes, it is probably Cheever’s most famous and frequently anthologized story. At one point Cheever wanted to parallel the tale of Narcissus, a character in Greek mythology who died while staring at his own reflection in a pool of water, which Cheever dismissed as too restrictive. As published, the story is highly praised for its blend of realism and surrealism, the thematic exploration of suburban America, especially the relationship between wealth and happiness, as well as his use of myth and symbolism.

Burt

In 1968, “The Swimmer” was adapted into a film with the same name, starring Burt Lancaster.

The story begins with Neddy Merrill and his wife lounging at a friend’s pool on a mid-summer’s day. On a whim, Neddy decides to get home by swimming across all the pools in the county, and starts off enthusiastically and full of youthful energy. In the early stops on his journey, he is enthusiastically greeted by friends, who welcome him with drinks. It is readily apparent that he is well-regarded and from an upper-class social standing.

Reflection

Midway through his journey, things gradually take on a darker and ultimately surreal tone. Despite everything taking place over just one afternoon, it becomes unclear how much time has passed. At the beginning of the story, it was clearly mid-summer, but by the end all natural signs point to the season being autumn. Different people Neddy encounters mention misfortune and money troubles he doesn’t remember, and he is outright unwelcome at several houses which should’ve certainly been beneath him. His earlier, youthful energy leaves him, and it becomes increasingly painful and difficult for him to swim on. Finally, he staggers back home, only to find his house decrepit, empty, and abandoned.

dark swimming pool

Beauty of the Past Karezoid

Pool Sculpture

pool art

Mermaid

mermaid

Vladimir Kush

Vladimir Kush

ShellCastle

ShellCastle

Sunset on the Ocean

sunset on sea

Underwater Studio Pinewood

A shot to promote Pinewood Studios underwater stage.

A Night To Remember

Titanic

Levi Van Veluw

Levi Van Veluw

Bad Dog

Richard Jackson, Bad Dog, 2013

BlogDog

BlogDog

Faces

faces

Michael Mapes

Michael Mapes

Fractured Face

Fractured Face

Soul Out

soul out by deenesh ghyczy

Xiao Xiao, 2012

Xiao Xiao, 2012,

Eyes X Five

KEVIN SYENS

They’re Back

scott listfield

Magritte Airshow

Magritte Air Show

Plane Trail

Plane Trail

River Clouds

river valley

The Drop

The Drop

Mistake

Mistake

A Man Called Horse

Screen shot 2013-04-09 at 19.40.34

Guinness Ad

White Horse

white horse painting

Returning from the Hunt

cowboy painting

Horse

Horses 111 by dimitar hristov

The Absurd

Business Man

In philosophy, “the Absurd” refers to the conflict between the human tendency to seek inherent value and meaning in life and the human inability to find any. In this context absurd does not mean “logically impossible”, but rather “humanly impossible”. The universe and the human mind do not each separately cause the Absurd, but rather, the Absurd arises by the contradictory nature of the two existing simultaneously. Absurdism, therefore, is a philosophical school of thought stating that the efforts of humanity to find inherent meaning will ultimately fail (and hence are absurd) because the sheer amount of information as well as the vast realm of the unknown make certainty impossible. And yet, some absurdists state that one should embrace the absurd condition of humankind while conversely continuing to explore and search for meaning. As a philosophy, absurdism thus also explores the fundamental nature of the Absurd and how individuals, once becoming conscious of the Absurd, should respond to it.

Absurd Threatre

Because of the world’s absurdity, at any point in time, anything can happen to anyone, and a tragic event could plummet someone into direct confrontation with the Absurd. The notion of the absurd has been prominent in literature throughout history. Many of the literary works of Søren Kierkegaard, Samuel Beckett, Franz Kafka, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Eugene Ionesco, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Albert Camus contain descriptions of people who encounter the absurdity of the world.

quotevetica

TV Heads

Gary & Tim

Gary & Tim

Hamlet

Hamlet

“Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio; a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy; he hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is! My gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now? Your gambols? Your songs? Your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar?”

(Hamlet, V.i)

Split Face

split face

perfection

Perfection

You’re Nice

you're nice

Freckles Smile

smile

Beautiful Freckles

freckles

Kelloggs Freckles

Kelloggs Freckles

Kelloggs Top Cat

Bedtime Holidays

bed travel

Dream Story

dream story

Rhapsody: A Dream Novel, also known as Dream Story, (original German title: Traumnovelle) is a 1926 novella by the Austrian writer Arthur Schnitzler. The book deals with the thoughts and psychological transformations of Doctor Fridolin over a two-day period after his wife confesses having had sexual fantasies involving another man. In this short time, he meets many people who give a clue to the world Schnitzler is creating for us. This culminates in the masquerade ball, a wondrous event of masked individualism, sex, and danger for Fridolin the outsider.

Eyes Wide Shut 3

It was first published in instalments in the magazine Die Dame between December 1925 and March 1926. The first book edition appeared in 1926 in S. Fischer Verlag and was adapted in 1999 into the film Eyes Wide Shut by director, screenwriter Stanley Kubrick and co-screenwriter Frederic Raphael.

 Eyes Wide Shut 2

The book belongs to the period of Viennese decadence after the turn of the 20th century.

Eyes Wide SHut 1

Helmut Newton

Screen shot 2013-04-04 at 10.59.51

Marlene

Marlene Dietrich

Smoke

Smoke

 

And?

And?

On the Beach

on the beach

Sand Walk

Sand Walk

Rough Ocean Waves

Ocean waves

Ocean Wave Nets

Ana Teresa Barboza

Castle

Castle In The Pyrenees

The Great War

The Great War

Shape Shifting Magritte

Christopher Marsden