thissideofthetruth

NOT THE OTHER

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As Black Elk, H…

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As Black Elk, Holy Man of the Oglala Sioux pointed out in his famous quote (see post below), the natural order of the universe is based on a circle. Why then is our civilization being sucked into the vortex of the digital age? It seems very clear that the digital world is completely alien to everything the rest of the universe stands for.

I used to blow-up my 35mm film stills and study the grain structure. Beautiful mappings of colour and detail all made up of circles.

If you were to blow up a digital photograph you end up with pixels/squares, as with the rim of a bird’s nest above.

I often wonder if the many thousands of images we see these days, whether they are on computer or TV screens, are in some way destroying our natural eyesight (eyes being round of course).

Or is the digital age slowly eating away at the very soul of humanity itself?

Life based on the great circle.

You have noticed that everything an Indian does is in a circle,
and that is because the Power of the World always works in circles,
and everything and everything tries to be round.

In the old days all our power came to us from the sacred hoop
of the nation and so long as the hoop was unbroken the people
flourished. The flowering tree was the living center of the hoop,
and the circle of the four quarters nourished it. The east gave peace
and light, the south gave warmth, the west gave rain and the north
with its cold and mighty wind gave strength and endurance. This
knowledge came to us from the outer world with our religion.

Everything the power of the world does is done in a circle.
The sky is round and I have heard that the earth is round like a ball
and so are all the stars. The wind, in its greatest power, whirls.
Birds make their nests in circles, for theirs is the same religion as ours.
The sun comes forth and goes down again in a circle. The moon
does the same and both are round. Even the seasons form a great
circle in their changing and always come back again to where they were.

The life of a man is a circle from childhood to childhood, and so it is
in everything where power moves. Our teepees were round like the
nests of birds, and these were always set in a circle, the nation’s hoop,
a nest of many nests, where the Great Spirit meant for us to hatch our children.

Black Elk, Holy Man of the Oglala Sioux 1863-1950

Chunosuke Matsu…

Chunosuke Matsuyama

In 1784, Chunosuke Matsuyama, a Japanese seaman and 43 of his companions began a voyage to find buried treasure on a Pacific island. During the voyage, a storm blew the group’s ship onto a coral reef and forced the sailors to seek refuge on a nearby island. However, the crew was unable to find fresh water or sufficient food on the island. With a limited food supply, consisting mostly of crabs and coconuts, the sailors began to die from dehydration and starvation. Before his own death, Matsuyama carved a message telling the story of his group’s shipwreck into thin pieces of wood from a coconut tree, which he inserted into a bottle and threw into the ocean. Approximately 151 years later, in 1935, a Japanese seaweed collector found the bottle. The bottle had washed ashore in the village of Hiraturemura, where Matsuyama was born.