thissideofthetruth

NOT THE OTHER

Month: April, 2012

Sculpting In Ti…

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Sculpting In Time (Russian “Запечатлённое время”, literally “Depicted Time”) is a book by Russian filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky about art and cinema in general, and his own films in particular. It was originally published in 1986 in German shortly before the author’s death, and published in English in 1987, translated by Kitty Hunter-Blair. The title refers to Tarkovsky’s own name for his style of filmmaking.

The book’s main statement about the nature of cinema is summarized in the statement, “The dominant, all-powerful factor of the film image is rhythm, expressing the course of time within the frame.” Tarkovsky describes his own distaste for the growing popularity of rapid-cut editing and other devices that he believes to be contrary to the true artistic nature of the cinema.

The book contains a great deal of poems by the filmmaker’s father Arseny Alexandrovich Tarkovsky along with a fair amount of Tarkovsky’s personal writings on his life and work, lectures and discussions during making of Andrei Rublyov with a film history student named Olga Surkova, who later became a professional critic and helped in writing of this book. The book has commentary on each of his 7 major feature films, and his complex relationship with the Soviet Union. The final chapter, a discussion of his film The Sacrifice, was dictated in the last weeks of his life.

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Tim Vollmer

Tim Vollmer

Vonnegut-soul growth

Vonnegut-soul growth

At the opening …

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At the opening of the book, the narrator, an everyman named John (a.k.a. Jonah), describes a time when he was planning to write a book about what important Americans did on the day Hiroshima was bombed. While researching this topic, John becomes involved with the children of Felix Hoenikker, a fictional Nobel laureate physicist who helped develop the atomic bomb. John travels to Ilium, New York, to interview the Hoenikker children and others for his book. In Ilium John meets, among others, Dr. Asa Breed, who was the supervisor “on paper” of Felix Hoenikker. As the novel progresses, John learns of a substance called ice-nine, created by the late Hoenikker and now secretly in the possession of his children. Ice-nine is an alternative structure of water that is solid at room temperature. When a crystal of ice-nine contacts liquid water, it becomes a seed crystal that makes the molecules of liquid water arrange themselves into the solid form, ice-nine.

John and the Hoenikker children eventually end up on the fictional Caribbean island of San Lorenzo, one of the poorest countries on Earth, where the people speak a barely comprehensible creole of English (for example “twinkle, twinkle, little star” is rendered “Tsvent-kiul, tsvent-kiul, lett-pool store”). It is ruled by the fictional dictator, “Papa” Monzano, who threatens all opposition with impalement on a giant hook.

San Lorenzo has an unusual culture and history, which John learns about while studying a guidebook lent to him by the newly-appointed US ambassador to the country. He learns about an influential religious movement in San Lorenzo, called Bokononism, a strange, postmodern faith that combines irreverent, nihilistic, and cynical observations about life and God’s will with odd, but peaceful rituals (for instance, the supreme act of worship is an intimate act consisting of prolonged physical contact between the bare soles of the feet of two persons, supposed to result in peace and joy between the two communicants). Though everyone on the island seems to know much about Bokononism and its founder, Bokonon, the present government calls itself Christian and those caught practising Bokononism are punished with death by the giant “hook.”

As the story progresses, it becomes clear that San Lorenzon society is more bizarre and cryptic than originally revealed. In observing the interconnected lives of some of the island’s most influential residents, John learns that Bokonon himself was at one point a de facto ruler of the island, along with a US Marine deserter. The two men created Bokononism as part of a utopian project to control the population. The ban was an attempt to give the religion a sense of forbidden glamour, and it is found that almost all of the residents of San Lorenzo, including the dictator, practice the faith, and executions are rare.

When John and the other travelers arrive on the island, they are greeted by President “Papa” Monzano and around five-thousand San Lorenzans. It becomes clear that “Papa” Monzano is extremely ill, and he intends to name Franklin Hoenikker his successor. Franklin, uncomfortable with this arrangement, abruptly hands the presidency to John, who grudgingly accepts.

The dictator later uses ice-nine to commit suicide rather than succumb to his inoperable cancer. Consistent with the properties of ice-nine, the dictator’s corpse instantly turns into solid ice at room temperature.

During John’s inauguration festivities, in which the American ambassador to San Lorenzo was going to speak, San Lorenzo’s small air force was supposed to present a brief air show. One of the airplanes crashes into the dictator’s seaside palace and causes his still-frozen body to tumble into the ocean, and all the water in the world’s seas, rivers, and groundwater turns into ice-nine, killing almost all life in a few days.

John manages to escape with his wife, a native San Lorenzan named Mona. They later discover a mass grave where all the surviving San Lorenzans had killed themselves with ice-nine, on the facetious advice of Bokonon. Displaying a mix of grief and resigned amusement, Mona kills herself as well. John takes refuge with a few other survivors (an American couple he had met on the plane to San Lorenzo and Felix Hoenikker’s two sons), and lives in a cave for several months, during which time he writes a memoir revealed to be the novel itself. The book ends by his meeting a weary Bokonon, who is contemplating what the last words of The Books of Bokonon should be. John receives inspiration from these words and the reader realizes he is planning to place his own book—a “history of human stupidity”—on Mt. McCabe (the highest point on the island) as a “magnificent symbol” and then die.

Pixie Girl.

Pixie Girl.

Jacek Yerka (1952- ), Autumn

Jacek Yerka (1952- ), Autumn

Art from scraping a leaf. China. Artist unknown.

Art from scraping a leaf. China. Artist unknown.

nature worship

nature worship

Ghandis top 10

Ghandis top 10

i want you . .

i want you . .

 …

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Phil Noto

Phil Noto

Banksy is a pse…

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Banksy is a pseudonymous England-based graffiti artist, political activist, film director, and painter.

His satirical street art and subversive epigrams combine irreverent dark humour with graffiti done in a distinctive stencilling technique. Such artistic works of political and social commentary have been featured on streets, walls, and bridges of cities throughout the world.[1]

Banksy’s work was born out of the Bristol underground scene which involved collaborations between artists and musicians.[2] According to author and graphic designer Tristan Manco and the book Home Sweet Home, Banksy “was born in 1974 and raised in Bristol, England.[3] The son of a photocopier technician, he trained as a butcher but became involved in graffiti during the great Bristol aerosol boom of the late 1980s.”[4] Observers have noted that his style is similar to Blek le Rat, who began to work with stencils in 1981 in Paris, and members of the anarcho-punk band Crass, which maintained a graffiti stencil campaign on the London Tube System in the late 1970s and early 1980s.[5][6][7] However Banksy himself stated on his website[8] that in all actuality he based his work on that of 3D from Massive Attack, stating, “No, I copied 3D from Massive Attack. He can actually draw.”

Known for his contempt for the government in labelling graffiti as vandalism, Banksy displays his art on public surfaces such as walls and even going as far as to build physical prop pieces. Banksy does not sell photos of street graffiti directly himself;[9][10] however, art auctioneers have been known to attempt to sell his street art on location and leave the problem of its removal in the hands of the winning bidder.[11] Banksy’s first film, Exit Through the Gift Shop, billed as “the world’s first street art disaster movie,” made its debut at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival.[12] The film was released in the UK on 5 March 2010.[13] In January 2011, he was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Documentary for the film.

banksy

banksy

The Galactic Centre. Infrared Mapping.

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01010111 01010111 01010111

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The Voyager 2 spacecraft is a 722-kilogram (1,592 lb) space probe launched by NASA on August 20, 1977 to study the outer Solar System and eventually interstellar space. Operating for 34 years, 8 months and 5 days as of today (25 April 2012), the spacecraft receives routine commands and transmits data back to the Deep Space Network.

Part of the Voyager program with its identical sister craft Voyager 1, the spacecraft is currently in extended mission, tasked with locating and studying the boundaries of the Solar System, including the Kuiper belt, the heliosphere and interstellar space. The primary mission ended December 31, 1989 after encountering the Jovian system in 1979, Saturnian system in 1980, Uranian system in 1986, and the Neptunian system in 1989. It was the first probe to provide detailed images of the outer gas giants.

Each Voyager space probe carries a gold-plated audio-visual disc in the event that either spacecraft is ever found by intelligent life-forms from other planetary systems. The discs carry photos of the Earth and its lifeforms, a range of scientific information, spoken greetings from the people (e.g. the Secretary-General of the United Nations and the President of the United States, and the children of the Planet Earth) and a medley, “Sounds of Earth”, that includes the sounds of whales, a baby crying, waves breaking on a shore, and a variety of music.

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The Voyager spacecraft are not heading towards any particular star, but Voyager 1 will be within 1.6 light years of the star AC+79 3888 in the Ophiuchus constellation in about 40,000 years.[1]

As the probes are extremely small compared to the vastness of interstellar space, the probability of a space-faring civilization encountering them is very small, especially since the probes will eventually stop emitting any kind of electromagnetic radiation. If they are ever found by an alien species, it will most likely be far in the future as the nearest star on Voyager 1’s trajectory will only be reached in 40,000 years.

Carl Sagan noted that “The spacecraft will be encountered and the record played only if there are advanced space-faring civilizations in interstellar space. But the launching of this ‘bottle‘ into the cosmic ‘ocean’ says something very hopeful about life on this planet.”[2] Thus the record is best seen as a time capsule or a symbolic statement rather than a serious attempt to communicate with extraterrestrial life.

 

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Having fled from his home in New Mexico after being jailed for a theft he may not have committed, Billy became a ranch hand and sheepherder in Arizona. In 1877, he was hired on as a teamster at the Camp Grant Army Post, where he attracted the enmity of a burly civilian blacksmith named Frank “Windy” Cahill. Perhaps because Billy was well liked by others in the camp, Cahill enjoyed demeaning the scrawny youngster.

On this day, 17 August in 1877, Cahill apparently went too far when he called Billy a “pimp.” Billy responded by calling Cahill a “son of a bitch,” and the big blacksmith jumped him and easily threw him to the ground. Pinned to the floor by the stronger man, Billy apparently panicked. He pulled his pistol and shot Cahill, who died the next day.

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the good bad and the ugly

the good bad and the ugly

let the camera be the gun and the film be the bullets

let the camera be the gun and the film be the bullets

unknown bullet painting

unknown bullet painting

Che Guevara

Che Guevara

Quotes by Winston Churchill.

Quotes by Winston Churchill.

Ruby Anemic 2012

Ruby Anemic 2012

DesignCube

DesignCube

Alexandre Deviers

Alexandre Deviers

Tim Shumate

Tim Shumate

"This Ends Here" by David Lyle. Oil on panel, 2010.

max temkin

max temkin

Liu Bolin. The Invisible Man 11

Liu Bolin. The Invisible Man 11

HG Wells. The Invisible Man

HG Wells. The Invisible Man

Kurt Hentschlager, ZEE

Kurt Hentschlager, ZEE

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Excerpt: Introduction to ‘The Omega Suites’.

…we are present at the moment before or after the body twitches it’s last spasm and not when the death rattle is heard. However, once we cease to be seduced by the beauty of the designed formal space, the civilized moral consciousness asserts itself to challenge privileging the esthetic reaction. Slowly, as we begin to understand what we are looking at, we must question whether the unseen action is any less brutal and barbaric because we perceive its instruments with out witnessing it actually taking place.

Some great moral works of art, such as Jean-Paul Sartre’s existentialist drama Les mains sales, André Cayatte’s film Nous sommes tous des assassins or Maya Lin’s Vietnam Memorial in Washington D.C., in which viewers cannot read the list of the war dead without seeing their own faces mirrored among the names of casualties, are based on forcing our acknowledgment of participation in human tragedy.

'Mirage' (Bronze) by Marc Quinn

'Mirage' (Bronze) by Marc Quinn

 …

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mical karcz karezoid - 'voyager'

mical karcz karezoid - 'voyager'

Extract. ‘The Time Machine.’ H.G. Wells. (1895)

‘It is simply this. That Space, as our mathematicians have it, is spoken of as having three dimensions, which one may call Length, Breadth, and Thickness, and is always definable by reference to three planes, each at right angles to the others. But some philosophical people have been asking why three dimensions particularly – why not another direction at right angles to the other three? – and have even tried to construct a Four-Dimension geometry. Professor Simon Newcomb was expounding this to the New York Mathematical Society only a month or so ago. You know how on a flat surface, which has only two dimensions, we can represent a figure of a three-dimensional solid, and similarly they think that by models of thee dimensions they could represent one of four – if they could master the perspective of the thing. See?’

‘I think so,’ murmured the Provincial Mayor; and, knitting his brows, he lapsed into an introspective state, his lips moving as one who repeats mystic words. ‘Yes, I think I see it now,’ he said after some time, brightening in a quite transitory manner.

‘Well, I do not mind telling you I have been at work upon this geometry of Four Dimensions for some time. Some of my results are curious. For instance, here is a portrait of a man at eight years old, another at fifteen, another at seventeen, another at twenty-three, and so on. All these are evidently sections, as it were, Three-Dimensional representations of his Four-Dimensioned being, which is a fixed and unalterable thing.’

‘Scientific people,’ proceeded the Time Traveller, after the pause required for the proper assimilation of this, ‘know very well that Time is only a kind of Space. Here is a popular scientific diagram, a weather record. This line I trace with my finger shows the movement of the barometer. Yesterday it was so high, yesterday night it fell, then this morning it rose again, and so gently upward to here. Surely the mercury did not trace this line in any of the dimensions of Space generally recognized? But certainly it traced such a line, and that line, therefore, we must conclude was along the Time-Dimension.’

Greg Brotherton

Greg Brotherton

Greg Brotherton

Greg Brotherton

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THE MACHINE STOPS by E.M. FORSTER

Anybody who uses the Internet should read E.M. Forster’s The Machine Stops. It is a chilling, short story masterpiece about the role of technology in our lives. Written in 1909, it’s as relevant today as the day it was published. Forster has several prescient notions including instant messages (email!) and cinematophoes (machines that project visual images).

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THE CONCENTRATION CITY by J.G.BALLARD

“The Concentration City” is set in a “city” encompassing everything in known existence to its inhabitants. The districts comprises endless streets and buildings and seemingly infinitely high and low levels, or floors, with few trees and little wildlife. Cubic space is in shortage and expensive; high speed transportation is in use, but it is implied that many people do not find the need to leave their particular area. The people do not know what lies beyond the endless urban expansion, but seem to care little, and generally assume that there are just endless levels and districts that have existed forever.

The short story follows a physics student named Franz, who devotes his time to the concept of “free space” – the idea that somewhere, there must be just infinite amounts of space, a concept labelled as nonsensical by most of the other city’s inhabitants. He also wishes to develop a machine for flight – a relatively unknown theory due to the complete lack of partially open spaces.

Eventually, Franz decides to travel on one of the high-speed rail coaches for as long as possible in one direction in order to discover what lies beyond the urban zoning and trying to find free space. The story ends when Franz after ten days of travelling realises that the coach is travelling back in the opposite direction. When he is finally stopped by the authorities, he notices the date of a calendar is unchanged from when he set forth travelling. Franz discovers that if one keeps travelling forward, one finally ends back in the same place at the same time.

Michal Karcz Karezoid - 'Exit'

Michal Karcz Karezoid - 'Exit'

unknown galaxy

unknown galaxy

“There is not some pre-destined pathway that you must travel, only the one that you choose.”

“There is not some pre-destined pathway that you must travel, only the one that you choose.”

Butch & Sundance

Butch & Sundance

Hiroshi Sugimoto. Movie Theatre-Akron Civic, Ohio, 1980

Hiroshi Sugimoto. Movie Theatre-Akron Civic, Ohio, 1980

kate moss at a screening of a johnny depp film

kate moss at a screening of a johnny depp film

Thierry Guetta

Thierry Guetta

Niels Shoe Meulman

Niels Shoe Meulman

Mike Dowson-'An Ugly Beauty'

Mike Dowson-'An Ugly Beauty'

Nelson Ponce

Nelson Ponce

Peter Nidzgorski

Peter Nidzgorski

Cole Thompson. 'Road to Nowhere'2011

Cole Thompson. 'Road to Nowhere'2011

robert frank

robert frank

Dennis Hopper

Dennis Hopper

David Tennant in The Badlands

David Tennant in The Badlands

on the road

on the road

Kerouac.

Kerouac.

Playboy Cover June 1959

Playboy Cover June 1959

'Self-Examination' - Ray Caesar

'Self-Examination' - Ray Caesar

André Kutscherauer

André Kutscherauer

Antoni

Antoni

Steve Dressler

Steve Dressler

Jody

Jody

De Niro by Steve Schapiro.

De Niro by Steve Schapiro.

banksy

banksy

Anthony Burrill. 'Make your mark.'

Anthony Burrill. 'Make your mark.'

try your hand at being a drip painter.

http://jacksonpollock.org/

a fun attempt

a fun attempt

Jackson Pollock

Jackson Pollock

unknown palette head

unknown palette head

Douglas Coupland

Douglas Coupland

Model

Model

kris trappeniers - paper cut artwork.

kris trappeniers - paper cut artwork.

Beth Hocckel

Beth Hocckel

Alex Goldstein

Alex Goldstein

moby

moby

shipwreck

shipwreck

pirate ship

pirate ship

Cory Loven

Cory Loven

'Deadwood Recon 5' by Karezoid Michal Karcz

'Deadwood Recon 5' by Karezoid Michal Karcz

The Troubles. 1970's Belfast.

The Troubles. 1970's Belfast.

derry

derry

Picture 73

Picture 73

war

war

Picture 30

Picture 30

big bro

big bro

Picture 68

Picture 68

baldam l'improbable

baldam l'improbable

paris unknown photographer

paris unknown photographer

Original sculpture by artist Nancy Fouts

Original sculpture by artist Nancy Fouts

Balloon sculptures by Hans Hemmert.

Balloon sculptures by Hans Hemmert.

Urs Fischer- "You" -2007- Excavation of gallery space "Enterprise"

Picture 50

Picture 50

halo-unknown

halo-unknown

Martin Zalba

Martin Zalba

myself

myself

Chief Dan George

Chief Dan George